Student Works Through College Selling Mary Kay

Student works through college selling Mary Kay

Pamela Carper, a freshman from Topeka, poses with her Mary Kay Makeup. Carper has been selling since July 2010, but has been involved with MaryKay since she was eight when her mother started selling it.

Pamela Carper, a freshman from Topeka, poses with her Mary Kay Makeup. Carper has been selling since July 2010, but has been involved with MaryKay since she was eight when her mother started selling it.

By Alexa Rush

Wednesday, October 5, 2011

Heads turn as a pink Cadillac passes by. These uniquely colored cars are known to belong to the Mary Kay makeup sellers, but who would expect a college student to step out of one of these beauties? For Pamela Carper, a freshman from Topeka, this is a goal she is determined to reach.

Carper is not the stereotypical Mary Kay saleswoman. Despite mostly working with women much older than herself, she feels completely comfortable in her work environment.

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Pamela Carper, a freshman from Topeka, poses with her Mary Kay Makeup. Carper has been selling since July 2010, but has been involved with MaryKay since she was eight when her mother started selling it.

“Being young has its perks, like having access to the newest products before anyone else,” Carper said. “The older women are a blast. They have so much fun, look beautiful and are great role models to myself, as well as each other.”

Carper’s passion began when she was eight years old and attended a Mary Kay party with her mother. After years of helping and watching her mom run her Mary Kay business, Carper signed up to start her own Mary Kay business when she turned 18.

“It was a no-brainer,” she said. “I absolutely love the company and what it stands for, so I wanted to be a part of it.”

Mary Kay was started by Mary Kay Ash in 1965. The company was designed with the intent to allow women to experience unlimited success. Although Mary Kay has a strong reputation for its makeup, lipsticks and eye shadows are not the only priorities for the business. The company encourages women to live by the golden rule as well as Ash’s personal philosophy: “God first. Family second. Career third.”

“I love that the company’s foundation is on the golden rule,” Carper said. “There aren’t any quotas to reach, it isn’t about competition and whenever you’re around the women of Mary Kay, you can’t help but be happy.”

Juggling classes, the social atmosphere and her business can be a challenge, but Carper is determined to make it work. Her roommate, Hillary Willson, a freshman from Las Vegas, Nev., said that living with a Mary Kay saleswoman isn’t as hectic as it may seem.

“She doesn’t work all the time, which is great because we can hang out. And she’s let me try some of the stuff and even done my makeup a few times,” Willson said. “It’s not like she has Mary Kay products scattered all over the room invading our space, But her desk, which is supposed to be the ‘study desk,’ is in fact the ‘Mary Kay desk.’”

One of Carper’s customers, Carlee Kyle, a freshman from Topeka, said Carper is an amazing business woman and naturally good at what she does.

“She’s always on top of things. If I need a product last minute, she can always manage to find it for me,” Kyle said. “She knows what the job requires and gives it her all.”

According to Carper, the business is not only easy to manage, but it’s good money and free gifts are given to employees on a monthly basis. Carper believes that being a Mary Kay consultant is a great opportunity and reliable job for any college student.

“When the economy went down, the Mary Kay demand actually went up, because as much as the economy sucks, women still want to look good,” Carper said. “I haven’t had a problem with selling even with this economy.”

After college, Carper hopes to make a career out of her Mary Kay business. She plans to get that pink Cadillac.

“Having a full-time career in Mary Kay pretty much consists of three hours a day of working at home in PJs,” Carper said. “I want a life where I can do what I want to do. If I want to travel, I will. If I don’t want to work that day, I won’t. I want to have a life like this while making women feel good about themselves.”

— Edited by Alexandra Esposito

 

 

 

 

I borrowed this, without permission, from this site: http://www.kansan.com/news/2011/oct/05/student-works-through-college-selling-mary-kay/

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